Archive for November, 2017

Regulation (EU) 1526/2017 (OJ:L231/1) on the non-approval of the active substance beta-cypermethrin in accordance with Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 on the placing of plant protection products on the market

This Regulation states the active substance beta-cypermethrin is not approved in accordance with Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 on the placing of plant protection products on the market.
Legislative background
Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 sets out rules for the authorisation of plant protection products in commercial form and for their marketing, use and control within the Community. It…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Regulation (EU) 1526/2017 (OJ:L231/1) on the non-approval of the active substance beta-cypermethrin in accordance with Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 on the placing of plant protection products on the market more...

RIBA calls for repeal of Fire Safety Order

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has said that the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order (RRFSO) SI 2005/1541 should be scrapped. They have said it should be replaced by a regime similar to that which preceded it, where fire services would issue building owners with fire certificates.

The RIBA said in its submission to the independent review of building regulations and fire safety, established following the Grenfell Tower fire, that the problems with the current regime were highlighted by the 228 high-rise buildings across the country that have been found by Government checks to have flammable cladding, meaning that they are a fire risk and fail to comply with Building Regulations.

The RIBA made fifteen recommendations, for example that sprinklers should be mandated in all new and converted high-rise residential buildings, and retrofitted to all buildings over eighteen metres in height. They further recommended a review of the 'stay put' policy, central fire alarms that can facilitate phased evacuations, and the introduction fo a requirement for more than one means of vertical escape in residential buildings higher than three storeys.

The RRFSO came into force in 2006 and repealed around 70 pieces of legislation related to fire safety, principally the Fire Precautions Act 1971 and the Fire Precautions (Workplace) Regulations SI 1997/1840. Under the Fire Precautions Act, fire services or local authorities were required to issue a fire certificate to certain classes of premises that assessed issues such as the provision of adequate precautions and means of escape.

A system of self assessment was introduced by the RRFSO, placing a duty on a building's 'responsible person' to carry out a fire risk assessment. Often, a fire risk assessor will be hired by the responsible person to carry out the assessment. However, the RIBA's submission claims that the appointment of fire risk assessors is made in an “unregulated professional environment”. The RIBA would like to see the re-introduction of mandatory fire certificates for designated premises that are based on independent inspections by fire brigades, as well as firefighters being given statutory powers of entry to buildings.

The chair of the RIBA expert advisory group on fire safety, Jane Duncan, said: “The RIBA welcomes Dame Judith Hackett’s review but we believe it must be more comprehensive, addressing the details of Building Regulations guidance as well as the broader regulatory system. The review should cover all building types and construction methods, not just those relating to high-rise, multiple occupancy residential buildings.”

The independent review is to look at regulatory systems used in different industries and other countries as it examines the effectiveness of regulation in the UK with regard to protecting people and buildings. Its call for evidence closed on 13 October, with an interim report expected this autumn. The Government will then make a written response, identifying any changes that can be made while the review continues. The final report is due by spring 2018.

For more information, see the:

Comments Off on RIBA calls for repeal of Fire Safety Order more...

Massive fines for two companies following death of a worker

A manufacturer of large concrete panels and a plant hire company were sentenced following the fatal crush of a worker by a concrete panel at construction facility in Worksop, Nottinghamshire.

On 8 July 2014 Richard Reddish, a 29 year old father of one, who was employed by Explore Manufacturing Ltd, was working in a mobile elevating working platform (MEWP) in the finishing area, removing the lifting attachments from the top of a concrete panel, which weighed around 11 tonnes and was stored on a transport pallet.

The accident took place when the panel started to topple, while Reddish was standing in the raised MEWP basket. The first panel struck the MEWP, throwing the worker from the basket, also causing other panels to topple like dominoes, one of which fatally crushed him. The transport pallets were supplied by Select Plant Hire Company Ltd who shared the responsibility for their maintenance with Explore Manufacturing Ltd.

An investigation carried out by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) confirmed that a rectangular metal frame attached to the pallet was not correctly connected to the pallet and there was no system of pre-use checks. The pallets were also in a poor condition, with a number of defects, including missing support bearers and stabilising legs. Other failings included inappropriate storage of freestanding concrete panels in the finishing area, which should have been secured in storage racks, and a lack of sufficient planning. The investigation also identified failings in the other storage systems on site.

Explore Manufacturing Ltd pleaded guilty for breaching the Health and Safety at Work Etc Act 1974 for failing to ensure safety and welfare of its employees during the transportation and storage of pre-cast concrete panels. The company was fined £1.3 million and ordered to pay costs of £13,922.

Select Plant Hire Company Ltd pleaded guilty for breaching the same Act for failing to properly maintain the transport pallets, exposing the Explore employees to risks to their health and safety. The company was fined £1.2 million and ordered to pay costs of £13,922.

After the hearing, HSE Inspector Stuart Pilkington said: “This tragic incident led to the avoidable death of a young man, whose death could easily have been prevented if the companies had acted following previous warnings to identify and manage the risks involved, maintain the equipment, and put a safer system of work in place.”

For more information, see the:

Comments Off on Massive fines for two companies following death of a worker more...

  • Copyright © 1996-2010 Health and Safety Blog. All rights reserved.
    iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress