Archive for November, 2014

EU Directive on transparency for businesses

The Official Journal of the European Union has published Directive 2014/95/EU on the disclosure of non-financial and diversity information by certain large undertakings and groups.

It sets out the social responsibility of big businesses. The term “big business” is defined for the purposes of this Directive as an organisation with 500 and more employees.

The businesses that come under this Directive are obligated to produce an annual report on environmental issues, social and employment, respect for human rights and anti-corruption.

The aim of Directive 2014/95/EU is to to enhance the transparency and accountability of companies and relieving administrative burdens.

The Directive begins implementation on 6 December 2016, with the new scheme taking effect from the calendar year of 2017.

For more information, see:

  •  Directive 2014/95/EU, amending Directive 2013/34/EU as regards disclosure of non-financial and diversity information by certain large undertakings and groups.
Comments Off on EU Directive on transparency for businesses more...

Consultation on the role of planning in preventing major-accident hazards involving hazardous substances

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Consultation on the role of planning in preventing major-accident hazards involving hazardous substances more...

Forty percent of construction sites fail unannounced HSE visits

A month of unannounced inspection visits to construction sites across Britain have found that a worrying 40% of sites are failing to sufficiently protect workers.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) are urging the construction industry to take the necessary action and ensure basic health and safety measures are in place.

After visits from 22 September to 17 October 2014 at 1,748 sites, the HSE found one in five sites were so poor, formal enforcement was required. Some of these issues could have been easily solved with a little more planning and management.

The main aim behind these visits was to improve health risks and 35% of the notices served were for problems such as management of asbestos, failure to control exposure to harmful dusts, noise and vibration and insufficient welfare.

A reoccurring problem was also highlighted again, with 42% of all enforcement notices being issued for failure to provide basic safety measures for people working at height.

A sum total of 313 prohibition notices and 235 improvement notices were issued.

Philip White, the HSE’s Chief of Construction commented: “These results show that whilst the majority of employers in the refurbishment sector are getting it right, a significant part of the industry is seriously failing its workers.”

For more information see, the:

Comments Off on Forty percent of construction sites fail unannounced HSE visits more...

Regulation (EU) 1136/2014 (OJ:L307/26/2014) amending Regulation (EU) 283/2013 as regards the transitional measures applying to procedures concerning plant protection products

This Regulation amends Regulation (EU) 283/2013 setting out the data requirements for active substances.
The amendment makes changes to wording in an existing provision.
Revocations and amendments
This Regulations amends:

Regulation (EU) 283/2013 setting out the data requirements for active substances.

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Regulation (EU) 1136/2014 (OJ:L307/26/2014) amending Regulation (EU) 283/2013 as regards the transitional measures applying to procedures concerning plant protection products more...

EH75 – Portland Cement Dust

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on EH75 – Portland Cement Dust more...

Regulation (EU) 1161/2014 (OJ:L311/19/2014) adapting to technical progress Regulation (EEC) 3821/85 on recording equipment in road transport

This Regulation adapts Regulation (EEC) 3821/85, on recording equipment in road transport, for technical progress.
It is important to note that Regulation (EEC) 3821/85 has been revoked, by Regulation (EU) 165/2014, on tacographs in road transport.
It amends Annex 1B of Regulation (EEC) 3821/85, replacing the date of 31 December 2013 with…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Regulation (EU) 1161/2014 (OJ:L311/19/2014) adapting to technical progress Regulation (EEC) 3821/85 on recording equipment in road transport more...

The selection, management and use of mobile elevating work platforms

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on The selection, management and use of mobile elevating work platforms more...

Workers “feared for their lives” at corporate manslaughter firm

The Rotherham plant of Sterecycle has been fined £500,000 after being found guilty of corporate manslaughter by Sheffield Crown Court.

An autoclave, a pressure chamber used to sterilize equipment, exploded, killing Michael Whinfrey. A colleague was left with “major injuries”. The force of the explosion blew a hole in the side of the factory and sent debris across a main public road and a car park, where other workers and pedestrians were nearby.

HSE Inspector, Carol Downes, noted the safety failings of the autoclave itself. It had been opened several times under pressure despite it being unsafe to do so, and the locking mechanisms had been damaged with every opening. Hammer marks around the locks showed the extent to which the mechanisms had been broken, requiring substantial force to be locked.

At one point, the rubber seal around the door of the autoclave was replaced twice a day. Sterecycle knew of the issue, but opted to replace the seals rather than investigate the cause of the problem.

Questionnaires filled out by employees revealed several “feared for their lives” and one reported he felt so unsafe he wanted to “leave the building every time he heard a loud noise”.

Sterecycle is now in administration following the accident which occurred in 2011.

For more information, see the:

Comments Off on Workers “feared for their lives” at corporate manslaughter firm more...

New sentencing guidelines proposed for safety and corporate manslaughter

Proposed guidelines have been published today, which will assist sentencers dealing with corporate manslaughter, health and safety and food safety and hygiene offences.

They are being introduced due to a lack of comprehensive guidance in relation to such offences. Although there is already a guide covering corporate manslaughter and fatal health and safety offences, there is nothing specific on sentencing food safety or non-fatal health and safety offences. In addition, existing guidance only covers offences committed by organisations rather than individuals.

Similar to the guidelines for sentencing environmental offences which came into force in July, a range of fines is set for companies with different levels of annual turnover, which vary in relation to the seriousness of the offence and the level of organisational culpability.

For corporate manslaughter, a medium sized company with a turnover of between £10 million and £50 million could expect a fine with a “starting point” of £3 million for the most serious offence, ranging up to £7.5 million while the starting point for a less serious offence would be £2 million ranging up to £5 million. The current guidance sets a benchmark of just £500,000.

Very large companies, with turnovers substantially higher than £50 million, could see fines in excess of £20 million.

For offences prosecuted under the Health and Safety at Work Act etc 1974 or other safety regulations, there is a more complex schedule, but a medium sized company with “medium culpability” for a serious incident would face a fine in the range £300,000 to £1.3 million.

Sentencing Council member Michael Caplan QC said, “We want to ensure that these crimes don't pay. They can have extremely serious consequences and businesses that put people at risk by flouting their responsibilities are undercutting those that maintain proper standards and do their best to keep people safe.

“Our proposals will help ensure a consistent approach to sentencing, allowing fair and proportionate sentences across the board, with some of the most serious offenders facing tougher penalties.”

The Sentencing Council is seeking views on its proposals through a consultation, which ends on 18 February 2015.

For more information see, the:

Comments Off on New sentencing guidelines proposed for safety and corporate manslaughter more...

Health and safety offences, corporate manslaughter and food safety and hygiene offences guidelines

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Health and safety offences, corporate manslaughter and food safety and hygiene offences guidelines more...

Copyright © 1996-2010 Health and Safety Blog. All rights reserved.
iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress