Archive for October, 2013

Proposals to revise and amend the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1997 (RIDDOR)

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Proposals to revise and amend the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1997 (RIDDOR) more...

HSE NI consult on new 2014 RIDDOR Regulations

The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSE NI) have published a Consultative Document, named “Proposals to revise and amend the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1997 (RIDDOR)“, which seeks views on plans to revise Northern Ireland's occupational accident and disease reporting requirements under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 1997/455 (RIDDOR).

The Consultative Document contains proposed draft Regulations which may need to be amended depending on the outcome of the consultation.

The primary aim of the proposals is to simplify the RIDDOR reporting requirements and ensure the continued availability of information required for effective regulation whilst removing reporting requirements for data which is rarely used, or could be otherwise obtained. The consultation also re-introduces a proposal to extend the period for reporting injuries that lead to a worker being incapacitated for work from over three days to over seven days.

All of the other proposals in this Consultative Document mirror provisions in the Great Britain Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations SI 2013/1471, which came into force on 1 October 2013. Implementing these proposals will keep Northern Ireland RIDDOR legislation in line with that of Great Britain.

The closing date for receipt of comments is no later than noon on 20 January 2014.

Comments Off on HSE NI consult on new 2014 RIDDOR Regulations more...

HSE statistics show Britain is becoming safer

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have published statistics which show an 11% drop in major injuries compared to 2011/12.

The statistics show that in Britain, between April 2012 and March 2013:

  • 148 workers were fatally injured – down from 171 the previous year;
  • 19,707 major injuries, such as amputations, fractures and burns, to employees were reported – compared with 22,094 in 2011/12;
  • an estimated 5.2 million working days were lost due to workplace injury.

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-GB
X-NONE
X-NONE

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Chair of HSE, Judith Hackitt said, “This year’s figures demonstrate that Britain continues to improve its health and safety performance, with important falls in the number of workers fatally injured and the number of employees suffering major injuries.”

She continued, “As the economy grows, new and inexperienced additions to the workforce can increase the risk of injuries to workers. We’re committed to helping employers understand that health and safety is about sensibly and proportionately managing risks and ensuring people understand the risks involved not creating unnecessary paperwork.”

There has also been little change in the industries in which workers are most likely to be injured by their jobs – with construction, agriculture and waste and recycling among the higher risk sectors.

For more information, see:

  • Statistics on fatal injuries in the workplace 2012/13, http://cedr.ec/16i;
  • the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations SI 2013/1471 (RIDDOR).
Comments Off on HSE statistics show Britain is becoming safer more...

Mine fine

The former UK Coal Mining company has been fined £50,000 for safety failings that led to an underground pit explosion and the evacuation of more than 200 miners from Kellingley Colliery, in North Yorkshire – Yorkshire's last remaining deep mine.

Leeds Crown Court heard that an explosive mixture of flammable gases had accumulated close to the area where miners were working. This was due to a safety curtain, designed to keep gases safely behind the coal face, being inadequately maintained. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the curtain was damaged with one section cut and another removed, making it ineffective and allowing the explosive methane mixture to slowly move closer to the working area and potential ignition sources. It was likely ignition occurred by sandstone falling on to sandstone.

Around 218 miners were safely evacuated from Kellingley's 501's District. Dozens of further minor explosions took place just behind the coal face as accumulated gas ignited. It was nearly three weeks before production was able to resume.

After the hearing, HSE Principal Mines Inspector Bob Leeming said, “If the explosion had occurred 20 minutes earlier, ten men would have been right in it and we could have been dealing with a fatal incident. However, this happened near the end of the shift and the workers were at a safe enough distance when the gas ignited. In only slightly different circumstances, the outcome could have been very different.”

He continued, “UK Coal Mining Ltd failed to recognise the risks of localised sandstone falls, that are part of the normal sequence of mining, nor properly specify the design and standard to be maintained of the protective curtain. In addition the workforce had not been fully educated in the purpose of the curtain and its vital importance in controlling the gas fringe at the tailgate end of the face. This case highlights the importance of adequate risk assessments and the need to properly educate and inform the workforce so that control measures are understood and properly implemented.”

For more information, see the:

Comments Off on Mine fine more...

Recycling firm fined after worker loses arm

Neath Port Talbot recycling has been fined £90,000 and £50,000 in costs after an employee lost an arm in an accident back in 2011.

Swansea Crown Court heard how 57-year-old Stephen John was asked to clean a conveyor belt which had become blocked with flack – a sticky black substance. The company did not have a risk assessment or safe system of work for the task, and employees had developed their own way of cleaning the belt roller. With the control switch located away from the actual conveyor, one employee stood by the switch and a second inserted a bar and scraped the flack from the roller. He then inserted his arm to wipe the flack away. A command was then given to the switch controller, and the conveyor started and stopped quickly. This process was repeated until the roller was clean.

However, on the day of the incident Mr John inserted his arm to wipe the flack away and passed the bar to a work colleague. The switch controller misinterpreted this as a signal and started the conveyor. Mr John's right arm was trapped and amputated.

Speaking after the hearing, Health and Safety Executive (HSE) inspector Sarah Baldwin-Jones said the potential for greater harm or a fatal accident was also a realistic possibility. “The company failed to fully guard the conveyor around the tail end roller and this failure resulted in employees having access to dangerous parts of the machine. The risk of entrapment is well known in the industry, and this company could have taken simple steps to fit guarding.”

She continued, “There was also no line of sight between Mr John and the employee operating the machinery and the company failed to carry out a risk assessment when the conveyor was installed. They also failed to devise a safe way of cleaning the rollers and to instruct employees on how to clean them safely.”

For more information, see the:

Comments Off on Recycling firm fined after worker loses arm more...

Regulation (EU) 321/2013 (OJ:L104/1/2013) on the technical specification for interoperability relating to the subsystem “rolling stock – freight wagons” of the rail system in the EU

This Regulation adopts the technical specification for interoperability (TSI), as set out in the Annex to this Regulation, relating to the “rolling stock — freight wagons” subsystem of the entire EU's.
Application
The TSI applies to:

the “rolling stock — freight wagons” subsystem as described in point 2.7 of Annex 2 to Directive…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Regulation (EU) 321/2013 (OJ:L104/1/2013) on the technical specification for interoperability relating to the subsystem “rolling stock – freight wagons” of the rail system in the EU more...

Railways (Safety Management) (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2013/237

These Regulations come into force on 11 November 2013 and apply to Northern Ireland only.
They amend the Railways (Safety Management) Regulations SR 2006/237 in order to implement:

certain provisions of Directive 2008/110/EC, which amends Directive 2004/49/EC, on safety on the Community's railways; and
Directive 2009/149/EC, which amends Directive 2004/49/EC, as regards Common…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Railways (Safety Management) (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2013/237 more...

Decision 2013/103/EU (OJ:L51/1/2013) on the signing and conclusion of the Agreement between the EU and the Intergovernmental Organisation for International Carriage by Rail on the Accession of the European Union to the Convention concerning International Carriage by Rail (COTIF)

This Decision officially approves the signing and conclusion of the Agreement between the EU and the Intergovernmental Organisation for International Carriage by Rail on the Accession of the EU to the Convention concerning International Carriage by Rail (COTIF).
That Agreement is approved.
Legislative background
The development of rail interoperability, both within the Union…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Decision 2013/103/EU (OJ:L51/1/2013) on the signing and conclusion of the Agreement between the EU and the Intergovernmental Organisation for International Carriage by Rail on the Accession of the European Union to the Convention concerning International Carriage by Rail (COTIF) more...

Firm fined over asbestos risk

A North East glass firm has been fined £20,000 with costs of £12,638, after potentially exposing around 200 workers and visitors to dangerous asbestos fibres.

Consett-based Romag Ltd also ignored recommendations from its own safety team to cordon off a contaminated area and arrange for an emergency clean-up by specialists. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) investigated the accident, which was triggered by two fire alarm installers when they started working at the firm's Princess Building, on Leadgate Industrial Estate in July 2011.

The two subcontractors had been told the building was asbestos free and unknowingly drilled through an asbestos insulation panel when they were installing fire sensors. They then used a domestic vacuum cleaner to clean up the dust and debris, and later used it in several other parts of the building, spreading asbestos around the premises.

The asbestos disturbance was discovered the next day, but Romag failed to take any appropriate action for nine days, even though they had been instructed to act immediately. The delay led to 180 workers and 16 visitors being put at risk of exposure to asbestos fibres.

HSE Inspector Paul Miller said, “Romag Ltd needlessly put at risk the health of nearly 200 people because they failed to identify the presence of asbestos before any work started and then compounded the failing by not acting quickly to clean the area properly. Any company that intends to do work to the fabric of a property built prior to the year 2000 must ensure that they have taken all reasonable steps to check whether asbestos is present before any work starts. That information must be then shared with anyone involved in the proposed work.”

For more information, see the:

Comments Off on Firm fined over asbestos risk more...

Fine for Coleraine council

Coleraine Borough Council has been fined £75,000 over the death of a waste and recycling site attendant back in July 2011.

Alan Devenney was crushed under an 11-tonne skip full of compacted waste at Loughanhill waste disposal depot.

The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSE NI) found that the council did not have a safe system of work for segregating vehicles and pedestrians or for lifting large compacted waste containers. In fact, they had failed to act on a warning received in 2008, and pleaded guilty to health and safety breaches over the death.

Anne Cassidy, an inspector with the HSE NI’s major investigation team, said all organisations need to make sure vehicles can move safely in workplaces, and keep pedestrians segregated from them. “Employees involved in lifting skips should also make absolutely certain that all equipment such as hooks, chains lugs and bars are fully engaged before moving a skip.”

For more information, see the:

  • Health and Safety at Work (Northern Ireland) Order SI 1978/1039;
  • Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 1993/37.
Comments Off on Fine for Coleraine council more...

  • Copyright © 1996-2010 Health and Safety Blog. All rights reserved.
    iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress