Archive for January, 2013

Dorset company fined over unsafe equpiment

A Dorset contractor has been fined for safety failings after a lorry driver suffered a serious hand injury while using unsafe wheel cleaning equipment on a construction site.

The driver lost his index finger, half of his middle finger and severed the end of his ring finger on his right hand in the incident at a golf driving range undergoing renovation close to the A1 Barnet By-Pass on 22 July 2010.

Westminster Magistrates' Court heard that he was attempting to use a wheel spinner, which removes mud and debris from vehicles before they access public roads. However the equipment, operated by Poole-based contractor Woodland Environmental Ltd, was in poor working order and had been adapted. This forced drivers to adopt an unsafe way of using it.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that a rope was held taut to hold a brake lever in position, and that as the driver attempted to release this it caught and severed his fingers. The rope had been attached to the brake lever for several months and had no place on the equipment. The condition of the wheel spinner was the responsibility of Woodland Environmental, but their management systems for monitoring equipment and procedures proved inadequate.

Woodland Environmental were fined a total of £5,000 and ordered to pay £8,833 in costs after pleading guilty to two separate breaches of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations SI 1998/2306.

Comments Off on Dorset company fined over unsafe equpiment more...

Steel companies fined over contractor death

Steel manufacturer Tata Steel and a specialist contractor have been fined a total of £320,000 for safety failings after a worker was killed by a falling metal bar in Redcar.

Kristian Lee Norris from Middlesbrough was working for Vesuvius UK Limited, to re-line a steelmaking furnace at Teeside Cast Products at the time of the fatal incident on 12 April 2008. He was hit on the head by a two foot long metal bar that fell approximately 10 metres from a passenger and goods lift overhead.

Teeside Crown Court heard that an investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that adequate precautions were not in place to control the risks from falling tools or other materials. There was a failing on the part of both Mr Norris' employer, Vesuvius, and Tata Steel UK Limited, which then owned Teeside Cast Products. Both defendants were aware of the problems but allowed the work to continue. They both pleaded guilty to breaching the Work at Height Regulations SI 2005/735.

HSE Inspector Richard Bulmer commented, “Kristian's tragic death may have been prevented had Vesuvius and Tata Steel made simple and adequate provisions to protect employees working beneath work and lift platforms. The risks associated with work from height are well known, as are the necessary safeguards. Yet on this occasion the precautions taken to prevent people or objects from falling were wholly insufficient and sorely lacking.”

Comments Off on Steel companies fined over contractor death more...

Room available for HSENI free asbestos training

The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSE NI) has sent out a reminder that there is still time for trades people to sign up for free asbestos awareness training.

The “Asbestos Training Pledge NI” will run until 29 March 2013 and can be attended either in a classroom or online. Although the classroom places have nearly been filled, online courses are still available. The online course allows the user to log-in on any computer at a time that suits you.

This is important training and can help trades people to protect themselves from deadly asbestos.

There is still a lot of asbestos material in buildings. Any building built or refurbished before 2000 is likely to contain some asbestos. If you are responsible for the maintenance and repair of non-domestic premises, you are the “duty holder” and have a legal duty to manage the risk from asbestos.

For information about the course, see hseni.gov.uk/asbestos/pledgeni or call 0800 0320 121.

For more information, see:

  • Control of Asbestos Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2012/179.
Comments Off on Room available for HSENI free asbestos training more...

Public Bodies (Water Supply and Water Quality) (Inspection Fees) Order SI 2012/3101

This Order came into force on 13 December 2012 and applies to England and Wales.
It is made in accordance with the Public Bodies Act 2011 and provides for fees to be paid by a relevant water supplier when an inspector appointed by the Welsh Ministers carries out certain functions under…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Public Bodies (Water Supply and Water Quality) (Inspection Fees) Order SI 2012/3101 more...

Public Bodies (Abolition of the Railway Heritage Committee) Order SI 2013/64

This Order will come fully into force on 2 April 2013 and applies to England, Scotland and Wales.
It is made in accordance with the Public Bodies Act 2011 and abolishes the Railway Heritage Committee (RHC), transferring its functions to the Board of Trustees of the Science Museum.
In doing so, it…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Public Bodies (Abolition of the Railway Heritage Committee) Order SI 2013/64 more...

Countries agree to new mercury rules

Following UN talks in Geneva, more than 140 countries have agreed on legally binding measures which aim to reduce mercury pollution.

Mercury can be released into the environment through a number of industrial processes including mining, metal and cement production and the burning of fossil fuels. It can also cause serious harm to human health and is known to permanently damage the nervous system. In addition, given that data recently published by the UN shows that mercury pollution is on the rise in developing nations, the agreement could not have come at a better time. 

Achum Steiner, the UNs Environmental Programme executive, said, “After complex and often all night sessions here in Geneva, nations have today laid the foundations for a global response to a pollutant whose notoriety has been recognised for well over a century.”

The rules, known as the Minamata Convention, will open for nations to sign at a conference later in the year. They will regulate a number of areas, including the:

  • supply and trade in mercury;
  • use of mercury in products and industrial processes;
  • measures to be taken to reduce emissions from artisanal and small-scale gold mining;
  • measures to be taken to reduce emissions from power plants and metal production facilities.

For more information, see:

  • Regulation (EC) 1102/2008, on the banning of exports of metallic mercury and certain mercury compounds and mixtures and the safe storage of metallic mercury;
  • Mercury Export and Data (Enforcement) Regulations SI 2010/265.

Comments Off on Countries agree to new mercury rules more...

REACH update

With the addition of 54 new Substances of Very High Concern (SVHCs) to the Candidate List, it now contains a total of 138 substances and the target set by Vice-President Tajani and Commissioner PotoÄÂ�nik to have 136 SVHCs on the Candidate List by the end of 2012 has been reached.

There are legal obligations that companies may have resulting from the inclusion of substances in the Candidate List and these apply to the listed substances on their own, in mixtures or in articles. You can find further information and details of the 54 substances included at: http://cedr.ec/l0.

Also published is the fourth European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) recommendation of substances for authorisation from the Candidate List. It recommends 10 chemicals which are classified as carcinogenic or toxic to reproduction and used in applications where there is potential for worker exposure. They have been prioritised based on their hazard properties; volumes used, and use related potential for exposure to humans.

Further information and details of the 10 substances is at http://cedr.ec/kz.

For more information see:

  • Regulation (EC) 1907/2006, on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH).
Comments Off on REACH update more...

Mine charged with manslaughter

The manager of Gleision Colliery in South Wales has been charged with gross negligence manslaughter following the deaths of four miners in September 2011.

MNS Mining, the company which owns the colliery, has also been summonsed for four counts of corporate manslaughter. Both will appear at Neath Magistrates' Court on 1 February.

The four men died after becoming trapped in the mine at Cilybebyll in the Swansea Valley when the area they were working in was engulfed by an enormous inrush of water. An estimated half a million gallons of water entered the area in around three minutes and a major rescue operation was launched following the incident.

Malcolm McHaffie, deputy head of special crime at the Crown Prosecution Service, commented, “The prosecution alleges that because of the way in which its activities were managed or organised by its senior management, namely Malcolm Fyfield, the company caused the deaths of the miners by failing to ensure a safe system of working was in place. It is alleged that this failure amounted to a gross breach of duty of care owed by the company to each of the four mine workers.”

For more information, see the:

Comments Off on Mine charged with manslaughter more...

New Energy Performance of Buildings Regulations for England and Wales

The Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations SI 2012/3118 came into force on 9 January 2013 and consolidate the Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations SI 2007/991, and their subsequent amendments.

They introduce the following additional requirements arising from Directive 2010/31/EU, on the same subject:

  • property advertisements must include details of the energy performance certificate (EPC) rating where available;
  • display energy certificates (DECs) are required in public buildings larger than 500m2 that are frequently visited by the public;
  • an EPC must be displayed in commercial premises larger than 500m2 that are frequently visited by the public;
  • the content of the EPC is to be improved by including a list of energy efficiency improvements that could be carried out and providing consumers with information on this.

They also remove what is referred to as “gold-plating” (meaning going beyond the minimum requirements) by:

  • extending the list of buildings exempt from the requirement to have an EPC, so it now includes:
    • buildings and monuments officially protected as part of a designated environment or because of their special architectural or historical merit,
    • buildings which are used for religious activities or as places of worship,
    • non-residential agricultural buildings which are in use by a sector covered by a national sectoral agreement on energy performance, and
    • stand-alone dwellings with a total useful floor area of less than 50m2;
  • removing the requirement to attach an EPC to an estate agent’s written particulars.
Comments Off on New Energy Performance of Buildings Regulations for England and Wales more...

Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations SI 2012/3118

These Regulations came into force on 9 January 2013 and apply to England and Wales only.
They consolidate the Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations SI 2007/991, and their subsequent amendments.
Legislative background
The Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations SI 2007/991 implemented, for…

Details on this legislative text is provided by Cedrec. Please click here to see the summary.

Comments Off on Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations SI 2012/3118 more...

Copyright © 1996-2010 Health and Safety Blog. All rights reserved.
iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress